Y5/6 Fractions

People often find the concept of fractions tricky and below you will find a table with the key objectives for Y5 and Y6 related to fractions (and decimals and percentages).  Alongside the objective I have added some tips or activities that will help you practice the skills needed.
 
The first absolutely important thing when you are working on this as a family is variance.  Variance means that the same type of knowledge and calculation can be used in lots of different contexts.  This will be vital when you are answering complex questions in tests.
 
The second vital thing that can not be stressed enough is the importance of times tables.  Fractions are just basic multiplication facts and division facts but in a different context.   Children in Year 5 have this week been given passwords for Rock Star Maths.  This will help with tables.
Links to useful fractions resources
 
RockStar Maths (x tables games) - This is a resource that we have just bought into and will be available for all children.  We have just given logins to Year 5 children at the moment.  The logins will allow the children to use apps too and so if you have an iPad or an Android tablet you will be able to download the app play it there.  Times tables are absolutely vital for fractions and all children should know their times tables from the end of Year 4.  By the time they reach the end of Year 5 they should also be confident with division facts too.   Search the web or app store for Times Tables Rock Stars (Bruno Reddy).  The organisation is St Peter's Junior School, Tavistock.  You will then need to use your login credentials.
What do you need to know?
 

Y5 Objective

Notes

Y6 Objective

Notes

recognise and use thousandths and relate them to tenths, hundredths and decimal equivalents  

(appears also in Equivalence)

 

 

 

 

compare and order fractions whose denominators are all multiples of the same number

 

compare and order fractions, including fractions >1

 

 

read, write, order and compare numbers with up to three decimal places

 

identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places

 

round decimals with two decimal places to the nearest whole number and to one decimal place

 

solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy

 

identify, name and write equivalent fractions of a given fraction, represented visually, including tenths and hundredths

 

use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination

 

 

read and write decimal numbers as fractions (e.g. 0.71 = 71/100)

 

recognise and use thousandths and relate them to tenths, hundredths and decimal equivalents

 

associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents (e.g. 0.375) for a simple fraction (e.g. 3/8)

 

recognise the per cent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to “number of parts per hundred”, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100 as a decimal fraction

 

recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts

 

add and subtract fractions with the same denominator and multiples of the same number

 

recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to the other and write mathematical statements > 1 as a mixed number (e.g. 2/5 + 4/5 = 6/5 = 11/5)

 

add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the

concept of equivalent fractions

 

 

multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers, supported by materials and diagrams

 

multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form (e.g. 1/4 × 1/2 = 1/8)

 

multiply one-digit numbers with up to two decimal places by whole numbers

 

 

 

divide proper fractions by whole numbers (e.g. 1/3 ÷ 2 = 1/6 )

 

 

 

 

multiply one-digit numbers with up to two decimal places by whole numbers

 

 

 

multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 where the answers are up to three decimal places

 

 

 

identify the value of each digit to three decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100

and 1000 where the answers are up to three decimal places

 

 

 

associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents (e.g. 0.375) for a simple fraction

(e.g. 3/8)

 

 

 

use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to two decimal places